Features

Misconceptions About Chinese-Filipino Student Orgs Like DLSU’s Englicom

As a culture-oriented org, it celebrates the Chinese heritage in the Philippines, but not without people having misconceptions about it. Read on to find out the myths about Englicom and what it's really all about.
IMAGE DLSU Englicom

Englicom (which stands for the colleges of engineering, liberal arts, and commerce) is one of DLSU’s oldest and largest orgs, and it caters to Chinese-Filipino and Filipino students. As a culture-oriented org, it celebrates Chinese heritage in the Philippines, but not without people having misconceptions about it. Read on to find out the myths about Englicom and what it’s really all about.

  1. It’s for Chinese Filipino students only.

Englicom may revolve around Chinese culture, but it’s open to all DLSU students—the same way a Korean or Japanese org is open to all students. Dorothy Jem Chen, who’s been a member for four years, says, “I have worked with great people in the organization, and it didn’t matter if they were Chinese or not. We always have non-Chinese members.”

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW
CONTINUE READING BELOW
Recommended Videos
  1. It’s alienating or cliquish.

Some of Englicom’s university-wide events are more cultural, but these aren’t alienating since they’re celebratory and fun in nature. During the Chinese New Year festivities around February, students can enjoy Chinese food and lion and dragon dance performances. For the Mid-Autumn Festival around September, students can experience the thrill of winning prizes in Englicom’s dice game (you throw six dice into a bowl, and based on the number combination, you may win something big).

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW
  1. It’s a dating or matchmaking org.

Dorothy shares, “A lot of couples are created in the org, but we’re not a dating org. We don’t do anything to create these couples, as funny as it sounds. I would think that since most of us are Chinoys, we have the same culture; plus, we spend a lot of time in the tambayan, so good friendships are built. Maybe that’s what starts the ligawan stage.”

Apart from promoting Chinoy culture, Englicom also has socio-civic activities. It holds fundraisers for its beneficiaries and scholars. One of them is Transcend, an annual seminar on business and corporate social responsibility. It also has outreach programs and medical missions to Little Stars Daycare Center, its partner daycare center in Bulacan.

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

“We want to integrate Filipino and Chinese cultures, as well as serve the community through our civic activities,” states Abbiegael Chu, the org’s documentations officer. “Through them, I feel that we are able to awaken people’s interest towards the Chinese culture and helping others.”

  1. It shelters students.

It’s easy to think that members of Englicom are sheltered if you think Englicom is a Chinoys-only org. But as a socio-civic org, Englicom has let its members meet different kinds of people on campus. And aside from welcoming people of different cultures and treating them equally, Englicom has helped students become strong leaders. Dorothy used to be the executive vice president for internal affairs, where she handled the finance, documentations, creatives, training and development, and membership committees. She was able to make the org’s systems more efficient, and she learned to be more adaptable, assertive, and considerate.

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

Abbigael learned to leave her shell and be more vocal with her ideas, adding, “Englicom has also encouraged me to be more proactive and apply to numerous central committees in other orgs. It’s become a stepping stone to who I strive to be.”

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

Francine Sia, the project head of Englicom’s cultural events, learned to organize activities and manage her time, and even listen better and accept constructive criticism. “Listening to other people’s opinions and getting their insights helped me make decisions that needed to be done.”

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW
your REACTION
HEART

15

YAY

2

OMG

1

CUTE

0

/////////////////////////////
COMMENTS. JOIN THE DISCUSSION BELOW!
Comments
About the author
Stephanie Shi
Contributing Writer
VIEW OTHER ARTICLES FROM Stephanie

Candy Bulletin

Welcome!
What're you up to today? Submit your OOTD, fanfic, essay, school project, org event, a pic of your latest hobby, or anything you want to be posted on the Candy Bulletin page!
Reminder: Posts will be subject for approval by the Candy team, and may be shared on our online channels. Plagiarism and copyright infringement are strictly prohibited. Only original work must be submitted.
Hi, you!
*1st 15 seconds will be uploaded
*File size limit (up to 60MB)
*File size limit (up to 60MB)
or
Upload Video
*For the direct video upload option, only the first 15 seconds of the video will be uploaded
*File size limit (up to 60MB)
Photo
Video
SoundCloud

By submitting your post, you agree to Candymag's Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

Thank you for submitting your post.
You will be notified via email once your entry has been approved by the Candy team.

Submitted posts will be subject to the approval of the Candy Team.

A few reminders:

  1. Candy Bulletin is an online platform where users can upload original work, personal passion projects, and other forms of self-expression, for the purpose of sharing with the community.
  2. You can upload photos of your curated OOTDs, 15-second videos, essays, poems, and more, as long as the submitted work is original, follows copyright laws, and free of any nudity, pornography, or profanity.
  3. You are encouraged to comment on one another's posts, as long as everyone remains respectful.
Submit Another Post
latest on CandyMag.com
 
x
Share
From self-love to daily life reminders, each one has a unique story to tell.
 
x
Share
 
x
Share
 
x
Share
 
x
Share
 
x
Share
 
x
Share
Napupuyat ka ba because of these groups or are you normal?
 
x
Share
LOAD MORE ARTICLES
Bulletin
A community page where you can share your feels and show your skills! Learn more here

PRIMO.

First. Pixie dust and paper cuts – these are the first things Wendy knew about Peter Pan. Aurora first met Prince Philip when she was sixteen. Learning how to ride a bike was also a first while I was growing up, but you are probably the first of too many. The first collection of dust and stars; maybe Luna will try to ask, who was your first? I might answer and tell her that it was you.

The first of too many stars in the sky. You are the first of too many fallen leaves during fall – and you will be the most anticipated snowflake as winter comes. A dark path that you can’t see without any light, hence, you were once the moon and there are the stars that shine so bright at night. Are we too early? Or we just really want to be ahead of time? Even in a glimpse, I would like to see the two of us connect as if we can reach the sky. There are other parts of the heavens you have never saw and other oceans you haven’t laid your feet onto – but the constellations will always wait for you. Close your eyes, love, close your eyes. Start counting backward: 5, 4, 3, 2, 1. Count backward until you see the twinkling lights that will guide you to the right path. To the right satellite; to the right person. A first.

There are many firsts – first love, first heartbreak, first sport you played, the first thing you do in the morning, the first thing you remember about the person in front of you. There are a lot. It’s actually up to us how we will consider something as a first. So, Primo, you are already a first of too many.

Bea Alamis A day ago
your REACTION
Pick a sticker to view stories by reaction!
/////////////////////////////
CONNECT WITH US